Turkish literature

Turkish literature (Turkish: Türk edebiyatı) comprises oral compositions and written texts in Turkic languages. The Ottoman and Azeri forms of Turkish, which forms the basis of much of the written corpus, were highly influenced by Persian and Arabic literature,[1] and used the Ottoman Turkish alphabet.

The history of the broader Turkic literature spans a period of nearly 1,300 years.[2] The oldest extant records of written Turkic are the Orhon inscriptions, found in the Orhon River valley in central Mongolia and dating to the 7th century. Subsequent to this period, between the 9th and 11th centuries, there arose among the nomadic Turkic peoples of Central Asia a tradition of oral epics, such as the Book of Dede Korkut of the Oghuz Turks—the linguistic and cultural ancestors of the modern Turkish people—and the Manas epic of the Kyrgyz people.

Beginning with the victory of the Seljuks at the Battle of Manzikert in the late 11th century, the Oghuz Turks began to settle in Anatolia, and in addition to the earlier oral traditions there arose a written literary tradition issuing largely—in terms of themes, genres, and styles—from Arabic and Persian literature. For the next 900 years, until shortly before the fall of the Ottoman Empire in 1922, the oral and written traditions would remain largely separate from one another. With the founding of the Republic of Turkey in 1923, the two traditions came together for the first time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_literature


View: 32 Time(s)   |   Print: 6 Time(s)   |   Email: 0 Time(s)   |   0 Comment(s)

Quick  Access

 







 
 

Related Societies

Site Statistics

  • Registered users: 6 users
  • Online users: 0 users
  • Guest users: 6 users
  • All visits: 21191 visits
  • Visits in 24 Hours: 220 visits

© 2018 All Rights Reserved | Eurasian Applied Linguistics Society

Developed by : ISCDBU